The role of serum 25 (OH) vitamin D level in the correlation between lipid profile, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure

  • Adeleh Khodabakhshi
    Affiliations
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Public Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Kerman, Iran

    Physiology Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Kerman, Iran
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  • Milad Mahmoudabadi
    Affiliations
    General Physician, HSE Department, Gol Gohar Mining & Industrial Company. Sirjan. Iran
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  • Farhad Vahid
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. . Nutrition & Health Research Group, Department of Population Health, Luxembourg Institute of Health. 1A-B, rue Thomas Edison L-1445 Strassen, Luxembourg. Tel.: +352 26 970 771. Mobile: +352 661 58 44 86. .
    Affiliations
    Nutrition & Health Research Group, Department of Population Health, Luxembourg Institute of Health. Luxembourg
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Published:January 13, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnesp.2022.01.007
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      Summary

      Background and Aims

      Since the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is high in some countries, such as Iran, and the trend of hypertension and obesity is increasing, this study aimed to investigate the serum level of vitamin D and explore its correlation and association with obesity, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar (FBS), and lipid profile. Our hypothesis is that serum vitamin D levels are associated with risk factors for cardiometabolic disease such as hypertension.

      Methods

      The results of this article were extracted from a cross-sectional study with a sample size of 720 people in the winter of 2020. The serum level of 25 OH vit D was measured using the ELISA method. In addition, lipid profiles were measured using the Auto Analyzer photometry method.

      Results

      Serum levels of vitamin D (25 (OH) vitamin D) were significantly higher in the control group compared to the case group (29.5±16.3 vs. 26.7±14.5;P-value=0.016). The significant association between body mass index (BMI) and FBS (Beta unadjusted:0.024, 95%CI 0.009:0.038; Beta adjusted:0.020,95%CI 0.005:0.034), and triglyceride (Beta unadjusted:0.009, 95%CI 0.006:0.012; Beta adjusted:0.008,95%CI 0.005:0.011), and an inverse association HDL-C (Beta unadjusted:-0.079,95%CI -0.123:-0.036; Beta adjusted:-0.065,95%CI -0.111:-0.019) were seen in both unadjusted and adjusted models.

      Conclusion

      In conclusion, we report that obese people had significantly lower serum vitamin D levels than normal-weight people. There is also a significant correlation between BMI and blood pressure.

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